#33 in a series of background briefs

Common alibis that don’t matter

What is this page about?
Photographers have many good reasons for doctoring photographs after they are recorded, but none of those reasons help a photo qualify as TCQ.

If a photo undergoes changes that keep it from fully meeting the Trust Checklist, it is disqualified from TCQ. Period.
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A. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done to compensate for not initially getting the photo the desired way, for whatever reason

B. It doesn’t matter whether the changes make the photo look “just like” the scene looked at a time other than when the photo was taken (see def|pen)

C. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done to remove something very small in the scene depicted that might look like dirt or a mistake

(Removing sensor dirt and other “surface flaws” that are NOT part of the scene depicted does not disqualify a photograph from TCQ: see Allowable Change #3)

D. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done to compensate for something the photographer didn’t see in the frame when clicking the shutter

E. It doesn’t matter whether the changes replicate what could have been done had the photographer used different equipment

F. It doesn’t matter whether the changes duplicate the way the photographer could have made the scene look had they chosen to step in and do so

G. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done instantly (in the camera) or days/months/years later (by any means)

H. It doesn’t matter whether the changes fit the photographer’s personal rationale for what is “minor” or for what can be added and deleted and what can’t be

J. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done in a darkroom or on a computer (or any other way)

K. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done accidentally or on purpose

L. It doesn’t matter whether the changes were done by the photographer or by someone else