8 def|pen situations

What is def|pen?

  • 1. Lens anomalies

    during exposure: fine — A TCQ photograph can show the effects of lens anomalies like corner/edge darkening, barrel distortion, pincushion distortion, lens flare, and chromatic aberrations. As noted in #4 of the Allowable Changes list, in a TCQ photograph each of these may be left as is (assuming it meets rinairs), may be partially corrected, or may be fully corrected.

    post-exposure: never
    — A photograph is always disqualified from TCQ if any of these effects are introduced or accentuated after the photograph is recorded.

  • 2. Contents of the scene (subject matter)

    during exposure: fine — A TCQ photograph can record any three-dimensional subject in the world that is possible to photograph.

    post-exposure: never — A photograph is always disqualified from Q2 — and from TCQ — if after the exposure is recorded anything within the photo is added, deleted, moved, resized, reshaped, or blurred (apart from the effects of TCQ’s Allowable Changes).

    This disqualification also applies to things that “could have” been present, absent, or of a different position/size/shape/focus than they were when the photo was recorded.

  • 3. Weather effects

    during exposure: fine — A TCQ photograph can record any atmospheric effects present in the scene at the time of exposure, including things like fog, snow, rain, dramatic skies, brightness or darkness, and lightning.

    post-exposure: never — A photograph is always disqualified from Q7 — and from TCQ — if it misrepresents the appearance of the scene, including the introduction of weather effects that were not present during the exposure.

  • 4. Lighting effects

    during exposure: fine — Apart from limitations imposed by Q4, a TCQ photograph can record any lighting direction and effect present in the scene at the time of exposure, from sidelighting to backlighting to silhouetting to front lighting to overhead lighting to uplighting to any combinations of these.

    post-exposure: never — A photograph is always disqualified from Q7 — and from TCQ — if a lighting effect is added or depicted that was not present in the scene photographed (popularity on smartphones does not equate with “TCQ-qualified”).

  • 5. Depiction of the background

    during exposure: fine — A TCQ photograph can record a “blown-out” background, whether it results from overexposing a bright background or underexposing a dark background.

    post-exposure: never — A photograph is always disqualified from Q7 — and from TCQ — if the background is “cut out” after the photograph is recorded (see also cropping) or if a substitute background or sky is inserted.

  • 6. Panoramas

    during exposure: fine — A long, thin “panorama”-like photograph can qualify as TCQ if it was made from one exposure (or from multiple exposures between which the camera was not respositioned and the lens was not re-aimed, as per Q3).

    post-exposure: never — A photograph is always disqualified from Q3 — and from TCQ — if after an exposure is recorded it is combined with one or more other exposures before which the camera was repositioned or the lens was re-aimed (as is the case with the “Pano” mode on smartphones and digital cameras).

  • 7. Perspective

    during exposure: fine — TCQ photographers can position and point the camera wherever they choose, knowing that they are committing to the exact “perspective” that the camera is seeing when the shutter is clicked.

    post-exposure: never
    — A photograph is always disqualified from Q2 — and from TCQ — if after the exposure the apparent perspective is changed (or “corrected”) by reshaping things in the photograph, even if only a tiny bit.

    (This disqualification includes post-exposure reshaping that was programmed pre-shutter, such as Leica’s electronic “Perspective correction” feature and its smartphone equivalents. TCQ photographs depict what the camera actually saw, not what the photographer wishes the camera had seen.)

    TCQ’s how-to guide on perspective says the same thing.

  • 8. Blurring out-of-focus areas

    during exposure: fine — A TCQ photograph can be focused anywhere in the scene, with whatever depth-of-field the photographer wants, but:

    • In order to meet rinairs, something, somewhere in the frame must be in focus; see #5 here.

    • The photograph can have whatever optically-generated out-of-focus effects the photographer chooses as long as the focus plane stays parallel to the sensor plane (see next item).

    • Using contraswing or contratilt to achieve the toy-city effect disqualifies photos from TCQ; see #7 here.

    post-exposure: never
    — A photograph is always disqualified from Q3 — and from TCQ — if it does not depict everything in the scene as in focus as it can be based on what the camera recorded.

    That disqualification includes applying bokeh-blur with a smartphone’s “Portrait” mode (an effect that can easily be undone (see #732) if the photographer wants the photograph to be eligible for TCQ).

    How-to guide on focus and bokeh blur