More on FAQ #607

607. But respected international news agencies don’t allow any subject manipulation, do they?

Actually, when the term “subject manipulation” is as broadly defined as it is by TCQ (see #601), most news photographs are of subjects that were “manipulated” by someone at some point in the past, although usually not “for the camera” per se.

In “news” coverage, what most people would consider “manipulation of the subject for the camera” is fairly rare, found primarily when the set-up nature of the scene is immediately apparent to viewers.

Examples of news photos that have undergone “manipulation of the subject that was done for the camera and is immediately apparent to viewers” include a group photo of world leaders meeting at a summit, handshakes between heads of state, and of course “orchestrated” news events like press conferences, political speeches, and military parades.

But in respected news agencies’ “information” reportage — the standard used by TCQ in Q7 and Q8 — “manipulation of the subject for the camera” is more common (and just as apparent to the viewer).

Examples of information-reportage photos that have undergone “manipulation of the subject that was done for the camera and is immediately apparent to viewers” would include a CEO posing with his arms crossed in front of his company’s factory in a photograph for a business article on the manufacturing sector, or a cancer researcher in her lab demonstrating a new device in a photo for an article on progress in medicine.